Having a baby
Delivering a Healthy WA
Having a baby

Birthing options

A pregnant lady in labour

Where will you have your baby?

  • Hospitals in WA (external site)
    Information on the maternity hospitals across WA is available from King Edward Memorial Hospital, Department of Health WA. Use the links on the left hand side of the website to find:
    • Perth public hospitals
    • Regional public hospitals
    • Private hospitals
  • Family Birth Centre (external site)
    The Family Birth Centre is a home-like maternity care facility on the King Edward Memorial Hospital grounds in Subiaco, WA. The Centre encourages families to be involved in planning, and enjoy the events of birth in a safe, personalised setting. This facility is available to both public and private patients and for healthy women who anticipate a normal pregnancy and birth. Information on the Family Birth Centre is available from King Edward Memorial Hospital, Department of Health WA.
  • Home birth
    Depending on the level of care you require for your birth and where you live in Western Australia, you may be able to have a homebirth. WA Health provides a publicly funded home birth program for women living in the Perth metropolitan region called the Community Midwifery Program. Information on the Community Midwifery Program is available from Community Midwifery Western Australia.
  • Independent Midwives
    Independent midwives provide private care for expectant mothers - everything from antenatal visits, through the birth itself, particularly for homebirths and postnatal care.

Depending on the level of care you require for your birth and where you live in Western Australia, you may be able to have a homebirth.

  • WA Health provides a publicly funded home birth program for women living in the Perth metropolitan region called the Community Midwifery Program. Information on the Community Midwifery Program is available from Community Midwifery Western Australia.
  • Independent Midwives - Independent midwives provide private care for expectant mothers - everything from antenatal visits, through the birth itself, particularly for homebirths and postnatal care.

Vaginal Birth

  • Vaginal birth (external site)
    Most babies are born vaginally and without assistance. Different events happen to you and your baby during the three stages of labour. Go to page 13 in the booklet listed below for information and pictures on delivering your baby by a vaginal birth, available from New South Wales Health Department.
  • Vaginal birth after caesarean section (VBAC) (external site)
    If you have had a caesarean section for the birth of a baby in the past, you may have the option of having your baby by a vaginal birth. This option depends on why a caesarean section was done in the past and where the incision (cut) was made on you. Information on vaginal birth after caesarean section is available from King Edward Memorial Hospital, Department of Health WA.

Caesarean Section Birth

A caesarean section (c-section) is a surgical procedure. It is where your baby is born through an incision (cut) made in your abdominal wall and the wall of your womb. Problems that prevent your baby being born by a normal vaginal birth mean your baby may need to be born by caesarean section. Information about caesarean section is available from the Victorian state government Better Health Channel and King Edward Memorial Hospital Department of Health WA.

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Further information

» Preparing for the birth
» Management of labour
» Pain relief


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